Insomnia is a sleep disorder that millions of people worldwide have to live with. Individuals with insomnia find it difficult to either fall asleep and/or stay asleep.Insomnia commonly leads to daytime sleepiness, lethargy and a general feeling of being unwell both mentally and physically.
Fifty to 70 million Americans suffer from insomnia. It’s more common among women (I know the hot flashes keeping me awake are caused by declining estrogen and hopefully will pass as my hormones even out). It is also common among people who are obese or have high blood pressure, anxiety or depression. And more and more studies are linking weight gain with sleep loss.

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There are some tips which are help you to beat the insomnia :
1. Drink some warm milk before bedtime
Decades ago, scientists looked into this folk remedy and posited that tryptophan, an amino acid in milk (and turkey), might be responsible for its supposed sleep-inducing effects. Earlier research had shown that when tryptophan is released into the brain, it produces serotonin—a serenity-boosting neurotransmitter. But when milk (and other tryptophan-rich foods) were tested, they failed to affect sleep patterns. Warm milk at bedtime may be comforting, but it won’t boost sleep-promoting serotonin.
2. Drink herbal tea
Chamomile, lemon balm, hops and passionflower are all touted for their sleep-promoting properties. You’ll often find them in “sleep-formula” tea blends, but unfortunately their effectiveness hasn’t been proven in clinical studies, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Beware: drinking liquids close to bedtime can mean nocturnal trips to the bathroom. A cup of “sleep-time” tea might be worth a try…if you have a strong bladder.
3. Cut out all caffeine
Caffeine affects everyone differently, so if you’re sensitive it might be worth trying to cut down—or limit caffeine to the morning only. This can mean more than just cutting out a cup of coffee. The major sources of caffeine in Americans’ diets are coffee (71 percent), soft drinks (16 percent) and teas (12 percent) but chocolate is also a source. “Our ability to excrete caffeine decreases with age,” says Spielman, so while you might have tolerated four cups of coffee a day when you were 20, you’ll probably need to cut down as you get older. Cut down on caffeine or limit it to the morning; if insomnia persists, consider going cold turkey.